Early Childhood Education May be the Key to a Sustainable Society

kidsInGarden

Hi Everyone,

As Jess had mentioned last week, Albright’s Sustainability House visited 13th and Union to teach about sustainability and do another K-cup planter activity with the 1st grade classes. The week was a huge success! All of the students were very involved and interested in learning about this topic that they are beginning to become familiar with. It is always exciting to hear that more and more schools are incorporating lessons on sustainability and conservation in their science classes. It is even more rewarding to know that I am helping to teach these younger generations about the importance of caring for the environment.

For most people reading these posts, you most likely were never taught fundamental lessons of sustainability in grade school. For millennials, their teachers couldn’t image trying to teach Hardin’s Tragedy of the Commons to 3rd graders or even 6th graders. Our lack of early education in sustainability and how to live more sustainable are what make us responsible in creating the environmental issues that exist today.

As it turns out, teaching Tragedy of the Commons to grade-schoolers is not impossible. In recent years lessons of sustainability and conservation are being implemented in elementary schools across the country. The UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) states the importance of early education best by saying “education is humanity’s best hope and most effective means in the quest to achieve sustainable development.” Most of our actions as adults are a result of how we were raised and what we were taught in school. If we were not taught, at a young age, about the importance of taking care of the environment than it makes it hard to suddenly change our actions later in life as we become more informed.

If we want future generations to care for the environment or better yet try and solve the issues our generations have created, we need to root this desire in their brains at a young age. By teaching the youngest members of today’s society to critically think about how to solve environmental issues that exist today, the world we live in may be a better place for future generations.

For more information about how educators are incorporating sustainability lesson plans across the country, you can use the link below.

http://themodernape.com/2014/07/25/sustainable-practices-must-taught-early-age/

Once on the website you can look at specific lesson plans by click “Stories from the Field” or “Early childhood education for a sustainable society

Until Next Time,

Hannah

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